:3

askteamtheta:

sam-and-baby:

Eager to make some money, Baby and Not go off to find a robot to interview. They find one in an alley, sitting in some garbage.

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This is the sweetest thing I’ve seen in a long time.

feministbecky:

creatingfromculture:

guitarbains:

yes adventure time. explain colonialism and racial imperialism to children and high niggas.

ha

I literally texted my wife when this came on and was like “wow adventure time just described our society in like 5 seconds?”

hedgehog-goulash7:

preludes-and-prufrock:

awwdish:

thestraggletag:

thestraggletag:

submariet:

VAN EYCK

I lost it at the end.

Okay, I had to check out the Van Eyck thing. I was a bit in denial because, come on, every single person can’t look like President Putin!

There are no words to describe how wrong I was.

Reblogging this for my art history class this semester

buwhahaha

The art historian in me had to reblog this.

man I have a lot of feelings about Gods Will Be Watching

hushbutt:

I love this game a whole lot. Except for the frustration. But the frustration makes sense with what happens near the end of the story, so I’m totes okay with it.

And I wish there was a fandom because man do I want a BurdenxLiam ship to be sailing.

SAME.

hawkbye:

trying to comfort friends like

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raggamaninof:

teland:

jtotheizzoe:

science-junkie:

The intriguing science behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch
It’s a punch that has captivated our imagination for decades. From the distance of one-inch, Bruce Lee could break boards, knock opponents off their feet and look totally badass doing it. It’s one of the most famous — and fabled — blows in the world. Days ago, Popular Mechanics set out to solve the mystery behind it – and did.
Drawing upon both physical and neuro power, Lee’s devastating one-inch punch involved substantially more than arm strength. It was achieved through the fluid teamwork of every body part. It was his feet. It was hips and arms. It was even his brain. In several milliseconds, a spark of kinetic energy ignited in Lee’s feet and surged through his core to his limbs before its eventual release.
Read more

Now THAT’s what I call a useful application of science. The answer (at the link above) is a lot like how slender athletes can still whack the hell out of a golf ball or baseball. A fascinating blend of physics and neuroscience.
Next we’ll have to tackle the fluid dynamics of Bruce Lee:
“Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup; You put water into a bottle it becomes the bottle; You put it in a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend.”

This is so *cool*. Make sure you read the Popular Mechanics link. It all makes perfect sense, and I just never thought of it before.

Wow, it comes to show that Martial Arts is not only an amazing art, but a well calculated form of science as well.

raggamaninof:

teland:

jtotheizzoe:

science-junkie:

The intriguing science behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch

It’s a punch that has captivated our imagination for decades. From the distance of one-inch, Bruce Lee could break boards, knock opponents off their feet and look totally badass doing it. It’s one of the most famous — and fabled — blows in the world. Days ago, Popular Mechanics set out to solve the mystery behind it – and did.

Drawing upon both physical and neuro power, Lee’s devastating one-inch punch involved substantially more than arm strength. It was achieved through the fluid teamwork of every body part. It was his feet. It was hips and arms. It was even his brain. In several milliseconds, a spark of kinetic energy ignited in Lee’s feet and surged through his core to his limbs before its eventual release.

Read more

Now THAT’s what I call a useful application of science. The answer (at the link above) is a lot like how slender athletes can still whack the hell out of a golf ball or baseball. A fascinating blend of physics and neuroscience.

Next we’ll have to tackle the fluid dynamics of Bruce Lee:

Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup; You put water into a bottle it becomes the bottle; You put it in a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend.”

This is so *cool*. Make sure you read the Popular Mechanics link. It all makes perfect sense, and I just never thought of it before.

Wow, it comes to show that Martial Arts is not only an amazing art, but a well calculated form of science as well.

did-you-kno:

"Goodbye" has its roots in the 16th century when it picked up popularity as an abbreviation of "God be with ye."
Source

did-you-kno:

"Goodbye" has its roots in the 16th century when it picked up popularity as an abbreviation of "God be with ye."

Source

becausebirds:

Goshawk testing its flying capabilities. It is shown flying through a circular opening, horizontal opening, vertical opening and a tunnel. [video]

glumshoe:

iggy-master-of-all:

steampoweredcupcake:

can someone write a book about this
people who track wishes and assign agents to make them happen
like a sci-fi fairy godmother sort of thing

It shall be done.

fairy godmothers all look like men in black

glumshoe:

iggy-master-of-all:

steampoweredcupcake:

can someone write a book about this

people who track wishes and assign agents to make them happen

like a sci-fi fairy godmother sort of thing

It shall be done.

fairy godmothers all look like men in black